FYI x 2

1. The Clandestine Industries line Don’t Let The Bastards Keep You Down is old. It was released in 2012.

2. The Gray book signing at Book Revue in Huntington, NY on Friday Feb. 22 has been postponed according to their website.

This is what they said to me in an email exchange Thursday:

"As of this morning, the book signing with Pete Wentz has been postponed due to scheduling conflicts. We are hoping to reschedule this event for April or May, keep an eye on our events calendar for updates. http://www.bookrevue.com/events.html

 


Links to request My Songs Know What You Did In The Dark (Light Em Up) on the radio

All you have to do is click the link, hit the ticky box next the the song, fill in your name (all other info can be skipped), and do the captcha. You can do it for any station listed here. 

This list is super incomplete so you may notice your city/state/country missing. It’s not being ignored and you can still pick any station on the list and request the song to help the boys. 

Note: not all phone numbers are toll free. Be careful if you decide to call. 

AZ:

KRQQ-FM // 93.7 KRQ Tucson

Request Line (520) 880-5000

CA:

KIIS-FM // 102.7 KIIS FM Los Angeles

KIIS Request Lines: 1.800.520.1027

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131
Feb 08

fueledbysoundmedia:

Fall Out Boy at The Roxy. February 7th, Los Angeles California.

I was one of the few lucky people who were able to go to Fall Out Boy’s first show in LA for almost 4 years. Of course, you’d expect nothing less than amazing. I finally got inside the venue after waiting 18 hours outside, and an hour and a half later, Fall Out Boy comes out. They opened with Thriller, and the crowd was insane. During Sugar, We’re Going Down, Cassadee Pope came up on stage and started singing with them. They ended with Saturday, which was the best song to close out the show. All of the guys looked so happy, they played so well and were so exciting. It was so overwhelming to see these guys in person, because I’d never thought I’d ever see them live. Fall Out Boy has definitely got to be one of the best bands to see live.

Photos and live review by Natasha Mayani.


"Benzi has joined forces with PLNDR to bring you "GIRL | TRAPZ", a twenty six track mixtape displaying Benzi’s unique take on trap music for the masses. Everything from dance classics from 1990’s to today’s big house tunes are slowed down, chopped up, and taken to the hood by an amazing list of producers including exclusive remixes from Jay Fay, Royal-T, Aylen, Van Toth (GTA), Klever, Benzi, DStar, and more! There’s even a grip of new and unheard jams from the likes of Yasmin & Diplo, Bebe Rexha (who did the drops), Silver Medallion, Faux No, and so much more. Download this now and run the tarp!”
Download the mixtape, including a new song from Bebe, here. 

"Benzi has joined forces with PLNDR to bring you "GIRL | TRAPZ", a twenty six track mixtape displaying Benzi’s unique take on trap music for the masses. Everything from dance classics from 1990’s to today’s big house tunes are slowed down, chopped up, and taken to the hood by an amazing list of producers including exclusive remixes from Jay Fay, Royal-T, Aylen, Van Toth (GTA), Klever, Benzi, DStar, and more! There’s even a grip of new and unheard jams from the likes of Yasmin & Diplo, Bebe Rexha (who did the drops), Silver Medallion, Faux No, and so much more. Download this now and run the tarp!”

Download the mixtape, including a new song from Bebe, here


The Top Sound Exclusive Interview: Black Cards

Just a few weeks ago we hit you with a really outstanding EP by a duo fresh on the EDM scene. While Black Cards may be new to dance music, they’re both well known veterans in the music industry, and more importantly, they’re guys who possess a whole lot of talent.

After Fall Out Boy went on hiatus, bassist and music icon Pete Wentz formed Black Cards as his new main project. Originally, the group was intended to be a four-piece band, but after the departure of vocalist Bebe Rexha and guitarist Nate Patterson, Wentz and Spencer Peterson decided to continue on as an EDM production/DJ duo.

Anyway, I was blown away by their debut EP Use Your Disillusion – I had to learn more about these guys; they’re by far one of the most exciting acts to hit the scene in a real long time. So, with that said, we got a chance to chat with Spencer Peterson who was able to provide us with a much clearer picture of how Black Cards formed, the work that went into producing their hit EP, and what the future holds for the rockstars turned superstar producer/DJ duo!

Mike:

Hey Spencer, thank you so much for being with us! I’m sure things are really crazy right now with the release of your new EP.

SP:

Thanks for having us! It’s nice to take a break from retweeting things about our record for a second, haha!

Mike:

So let’s jump right in! Being from NJ, I was real into the band scene back in high school, and I know you were/are the drummer of Hidden in Plain View, but how did you get into music originally, and moreover how did you get involved in production/DJing?

SP:

I started playing drums during 4th grade in the school band and continued that all the way to the Atlanta Institute of Music after high school. Eventually, I left AIM to start touring and recording full-time — that’s what I’ve done ever since.

In 2008 I heard Justice’s ”Cross” and Wolfgang Gartner’s “Firepower“… that changed everything for me. It totally flipped my perspective of dance music. I played the shit out of “Cross,” and got way into the Ed Banger catalog — just finding all this new music I didn’t know about was really exciting. Our friends GRVRBBRS turned me on to a ton of shit too and I ran with it, especially DatA, MSTRKRFT, and the Bloody Beetroots. Then, about 2 months into early-Black Cards rehearsals, Pete texted me real late one night and goes “yo can you make beats?” I had no idea how, but I said yes anyways. I had Logic, but only used it for backing track stuff. The next day I got up and started teaching myself. Lots of youtube tutorials early on, haha!

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106
Aug 09

l-e-a-t-h-e-r-m-o-u-t-h:

fuckyeahpetewentz:

icecreamhdaches:

(Original question is part of 2 tweets. Should be, “Since you’re the target… “)

This is something I’ve attempted to address multiple times (on my own tumblr) and the defense tends to be either it’s a harmless joke or that it’s out of love. Maybe some combination of both. Whatever. Doesn’t matter what the defense is for calling him a faggot or a fag, it’s never good enough because there is no okay reason for doing it. There is no way to justify it. Nothing you can say makes it okay. It’s not a funny joke. It’s not a term of endearment or a pet name. It’s a word that has a lot of negative connotations and hatred attached to it. It doesn’t cause warm, fluffy feelings for those on the receiving end. It hurts. 

Pete has been an ally for as long as I can remember. As someone who isn’t straight, I’ve always felt really lucky to have him as one, to have him speaking out against homophobia. It weird to see the same people who jump all over the “Gay is not a synonym for shitty…” quote throw faggot around at Pete like it’s nothing. Calling someone a faggot makes you no better than someone who calls something they don’t like gay. 

The dude has been ridiculously good to fans for years. Way too good us. Way better than any of us deserve especially considering how a good chunk of the fanbase treats him. There it is black and white, Pete does not like when fans call him a fag/faggot. Have enough to respect for him to stop doing it. (And I shouldn’t have to say it, but I probably do: don’t attack him for anything he said above. You don’t have any right to tell him how to feel and he has not said or done anything to deserve being attacked. Above or recently or ever really.)

Side note to Pete: Because I know you lurk. Sorry again for even having to ask. Still feel terrible that this is even a thing. You deserve better. 

well said.

Okay,exept some of the kids that use ‘faggot’ in an everyday context are going to be gay kids who’ve had that thrown at them.I know you can’t cater a message like GINASFS to say ‘This is only appling to the 100% straight and cis people who have never been bullied or tourmented’,but you can’t tell a person that they can’t take back their slur and use it in a way that doesn’t hurt them.The word ‘fag’ will never be an insult to straight people.Never.Even if someone is insulted by it,the person using the slur itsn’t really insulting you,they’re insulting gay people.It’s not even an insult.That’s the point of reclaiming slurs,to stop them being insults to us and to either put them into disuse or make them into something else.I know that I can’t claim that the people online that use these terms are gay anymore than you can claim they’re straight,but no one gets to take that away from people that feels better by taking words that have hurt them and stripping them bare.

Bar that,Pete seems annoyed by the whole thing by the people that see it as an insult.It’s not.Me insulting a straight person by calling them gay should be as effective as me insulting a blonde person because they have blue hair.Faggot isn’t an insult.I’m a huge fucking faggot,and I have been all of my life.The word is nothing because I’ve decided to make it nothing,because if I didn’t,I’d be in a worse position.

td;lr nothing in what I said was ment to relate to the thing with Pete personally,I just felt I should point out to you that 1) if people want to re-claim their slurs,then no one has the right to stop them and 2) considering ‘faggot’ an insult is kind of homophobic.

Maybe it’s different for kids now. But when I was a kid, which was around the same time Pete was a kid, being called a fag wasn’t just harmful to the gay kid. It was harmful to the straight kid everyone thought was gay. It got you bullied and beat up. So the word being thrown at a straight person who maybe heard it as a kid and still remembers that is going to hurt. 

Calling Pete (or any stranger on the internet) a fag is so not the best way to try to reclaim the word. You’re (general you, not you specifically) just going to blend in with people who actually hate him and are using it as a slur. There is no way for him to know who is who. 

As I said to someone else, this isn’t about reclaiming a word. It’s about treating someone with respect. Something fandom is absolutely terrible at when it comes to Pete. If someone says they don’t like you calling them something, you shouldn’t call them that. Doesn’t matter what the word is or what weight the word carries for you. What matters is what weight it carries for the person you’re calling that word.  And reclaiming a word means nothing if it’s still hurting the people you’re throwing it at. 


106
Aug 09

sassypatrick:

fuckyeahpetewentz:

icecreamhdaches:

(Original question is part of 2 tweets. Should be, “Since you’re the target… “)

This is something I’ve attempted to address multiple times (on my own tumblr) and the defense tends to be either it’s a harmless joke or that it’s out of love. Maybe some combination of both. Whatever. Doesn’t matter what the defense is for calling him a faggot or a fag, it’s never good enough because there is no okay reason for doing it. There is no way to justify it. Nothing you can say makes it okay. It’s not a funny joke. It’s not a term of endearment or a pet name. It’s a word that has a lot of negative connotations and hatred attached to it. It doesn’t cause warm, fluffy feelings for those on the receiving end. It hurts. 

Pete has been an ally for as long as I can remember. As someone who isn’t straight, I’ve always felt really lucky to have him as one, to have him speaking out against homophobia. It weird to see the same people who jump all over the “Gay is not a synonym for shitty…” quote throw faggot around at Pete like it’s nothing. Calling someone a faggot makes you no better than someone who calls something they don’t like gay. 

The dude has been ridiculously good to fans for years. Way too good us. Way better than any of us deserve especially considering how a good chunk of the fanbase treats him. There it is black and white, Pete does not like when fans call him a fag/faggot. Have enough to respect for him to stop doing it. (And I shouldn’t have to say it, but I probably do: don’t attack him for anything he said above. You don’t have any right to tell him how to feel and he has not said or done anything to deserve being attacked. Above or recently or ever really.)

Side note to Pete: Because I know you lurk. Sorry again for even having to ask. Still feel terrible that this is even a thing. You deserve better. 

well said.

This is a very good argument, but I think the only way the LGBT community is going to be able to reclaim words like faggot is if they change the connotation of it. We’ve already mostly reclaimed queer, why not faggot next?

Pete Wentz has absolutely nothing to do with reclaiming the word. Not a damn thing. You (general you, not you specifically) calling a stranger a faggot is not reclaiming the word. Pete is not your friend. Yes, my gay brother and his gay friends call each other fags sometimes. And they can do that because they’re all gay friends (straight friends don’t do this because respect). He would not call Pete a fag because Pete is not his gay friend. There’s a big difference. 

And you know what? Even if Pete was your gay friend, it wouldn’t matter because he has said that it’s something that bums him out. It’s something he doesn’t like. This isn’t about reclaiming a word, it’s about respecting another person and treating them like a human being for a change. 


(Original question is part of 2 tweets. Should be, “Since you’re the target… “)

This is something I’ve attempted to address multiple times (on my own tumblr) and the defense tends to be either it’s a harmless joke or that it’s out of love. Maybe some combination of both. Whatever. Doesn’t matter what the defense is for calling him a faggot or a fag, it’s never good enough because there is no okay reason for doing it. There is no way to justify it. Nothing you can say makes it okay. It’s not a funny joke. It’s not a term of endearment or a pet name. It’s a word that has a lot of negative connotations and hatred attached to it. It doesn’t cause warm, fluffy feelings for those on the receiving end. It hurts. 

Pete has been an ally for as long as I can remember. As someone who isn’t straight, I’ve always felt really lucky to have him as one, to have him speaking out against homophobia. It weird to see the same people who jump all over the “Gay is not a synonym for shitty…” quote throw faggot around at Pete like it’s nothing. Calling someone a faggot makes you no better than someone who calls something they don’t like gay. 

The dude has been ridiculously good to fans for years. Way too good us. Way better than any of us deserve especially considering how a good chunk of the fanbase treats him. There it is black and white, Pete does not like when fans call him a fag/faggot. Have enough to respect for him to stop doing it. (And I shouldn’t have to say it, but I probably do: don’t attack him for anything he said above. You don’t have any right to tell him how to feel and he has not said or done anything to deserve being attacked. Above or recently or ever really.)

Side note to Pete: Because I know you lurk. Sorry again for even having to ask. Still feel terrible that this is even a thing. You deserve better. 


Six Celebs Speak Out About Mental Health

Posted by Rachel Mendelson 

Their lives may be far from ordinary, but actors, musicians, athletes, and writers have emotional and mental health issues just like the rest of us. When a celeb opens up about depression, anxiety, and mental disorders, it can have a major impact on the way people think about these issues. That’s why it’s so great that these celebrities came forward and shared their stories. We hope their strength and courage will encourage more people, famous or not, to reach out for help when they need it.

Pete Wentz

“One of the biggest things for me was being honest with everybody about it. And let them know, like, you know, there are gonna be times when we’re gonna have to slow down so I can just make sure everything is intact. The second step was finding somebody that I could talk to, but that I was going to be honest with and that not necessarily that they had all the answers for me, but, like, that I could get it all out to them and then, like, together we could piece things together. I found that talk therapy with this guy has been the best thing that I’ve had.”

Read the whole article here.

source


Pete Wentz inherits his dad’s summertime traditions

By PETE WENTZ Daily Splash columnist August 2, 2012 9:12PM

I remember looking back at a baseball ticket from August 9, 1988: the first night game ever held at Wrigley field. I remember the way my Dad had always made summers memorable for me; he took me to Wilmette Centennial Pool during the day and to Baskin-Robbins in the night, where at the former I was heaving my nachos into the boys’ bathroom at the anxiety of the local high dive, and at the latter he let me taste flavor after flavor and I cracked my kid teeth on frozen gumballs in bubble gum ice cream.

I remember Gillson Beach and getting in the backseat of my parents’ station wagon and trying to dodge the lava-like heat off of the metal of the rear seat belts. I remember being stuck in the middle seat of my dad’s company car listening to the oldies station (which might not have been old at the time) as we tore across the country to the beaches of the east. I was my dad’s vigilant listener, his muted advisor, his constant companion. I wanted to be him when I grew up.

I understand and remember this with an appreciation that can only come from finally being a dad myself. All of us dads have a little bit of Clark Griswold crammed into us that comes out in the summertime. This month, I packed my kid into the car and drove south to San Diego to get to Legoland. We stuffed the car full of Berenstain Bears books and road-trip snacks, which were alternated until the nap of all naps happened mid-book — his mouth ringed in sugar crumbs. At this point, I cursed every single driver on the southwest coast of the United States. But seeing his face as we ran into a life-sized Bob the Builder made out of Legos was worth every second.

I thought of my own old man driving me across the country to Stone Harbor, New Jersey, and the company I provided him — I was his sidekick. Now I have my own. I thought of the times my son and I have spent in the heat of the valley at the Los Angeles Zoo as we trekked back and forth. I always grill him on which animal is his favorite before we settle in the gift shop on the way out. A light goes off in your head when you hear yourself asking someone the questions you were asked decades ago.

The saying is that at some point, “We become our parents.” It’s beyond true; we do become our parents. I think the saying is meant as a joke or a lighthearted warning sign on the road of life. But I finally get it, and it’s a great thing for me. If I come anywhere close to my summertime dad, then I’ll be OK with that version of me… the best version of me.

Pete Wentz donated his fee for writing this column to  humaneafrica.org.

(Source: suntimes.com)